Research

These short articles highlight the findings from ongoing scientific research within selected Marine Parks, including exciting new discoveries and ideas for future projects. If you are a scientist, read about how you can see your work featured in the Atlas.

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Murray Marine Park contains highly varied geomorphology throughout the park, potentially encompassing many shelf reef habitats. The northern edge consists predominately of Lacepede shelf, a large shelf area intersected by ancient channels of the Murray River that converge at the head of Sprigg canyon on the continental shelf2. It covers representative areas of four bioregions.

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    Nelson Marine Park contains complex undersea topography, including lower-slope and abyssal ecosystems. It covers representative areas of the West Tasmania Transition bioregion.

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      South Tasman Rise Park contains a cluster of distinctive seamounts characterised by flat tops that potentially encompass many shelf reef habitats. The seamount areas are highly productive with diverse coral assemblages, which have been the target of historical commercial fishing efforts for decades owing to their ability to support vast fish assemblages1. The park covers representative areas of the Tasmania Province bioregion.

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        Tasman Fracture Marine Park contains deep reefs, seamounts and a fracture zone unique to the network. Small high-profile deep (rariphotic) reefs occur in the north-western and eastern sections along with an isolated high-profile reef in the north-eastern sector, south-east of the Mewstone2. The park covers representative areas of four bioregions.

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            Zeehan Marine Park displays low-profile platform reef across much of the shelf area. The eastern edge of the park is smooth and undulating before changing in the mid shelf to a more corrugated pavement characterised by 3-5m high ledges with flat faces. The park covers representative areas of four bioregions.

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            Franklin Marine Park is dominated by shelf unvegetated sediment habitat with high-profile deep reef features in the northern section. It covers representative areas of four bioregions.  The northern section of the park contains complex reef likely formed by volcanic lava flows, which at its shallowest depths of 35m support kelp forests (Ecklonia radiata) - a rare habitat type in Australian Marine Parks.

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              Freycinet Marine Park features sediment dominated shelf areas, a high-profile granite reef, and low profile reef ridges along the mid-shelf. All these habitats support a diverse array of invertebrate communities and fish assemblages. It covers representative areas of four bioregions.

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                Huon Marine Park displays multiple levels of seabed habitats from the large cluster of seamounts on the continental slope to low profile reefs and sediment plains on the continental shelf. It covers representative areas of four bioregions.

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                  Macquarie Island Marine Park features both sanctuary and habitat protection zones offering the highest levels of protection to this unique sub-polar park. It covers representative areas of the Macquarie Island Province bioregion.

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                    Boags Marine Park contains extensive mobile dune fields, likely dominated by crustaceans, polychaete worms and molluscs that live in and on sediments1. It covers representative areas of three bioregions. The southern third of the park has been mapped using fine scale multibeam 2.

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